Newgate Calendar - PIERRE AUGUSTINE, ALIAS PETER AUGUSTINE, ALIAS PETER CHUMLEY, ALIAS PETER CHAPMAN, ALIAS PETER DEVAL

PIERRE AUGUSTINE, ALIAS PETER AUGUSTINE, ALIAS PETER CHUMLEY, ALIAS PETER CHAPMAN, ALIAS PETER DEVAL

Executed before Newgate, August 31, 1791, For Robbing his own Countryman

            WE have already adduced instances of too many foreigners violating the rules of hospitality, in plundering the people of this country, while under their protection. When a traveller finds himself hospitably received in a foreign land, and more especially when he is there enabled to support himself by his industry, it is ingratitude, in the worst degree, to violate the laws of his adopted country, for the purpose of plunder. It is a trite saying, that British subjects, in a distant land, protect each other, but how often have we shown, that Frenchmen in England prey upon each other; even before the visionary rights of equality were attempted to be enforced. We have shown a Mercier murdering his patron, and plundering his effects; a Le Maitre, robbing a public museum, where he was generously admitted, and other daring violations of our laws by Frenchmen, who existed alone under their protection, and a Mallard, after receiving charity, attempted to murder Mr. Carter.

            The treacherous foreigner, whom we now bring forward, had long continued his depredations on our unsuspicious countrymen; which may be readily conjectured from the numbers of feigned names assumed, and under all which he was indicted. Monsieur Alexander Delarade was a French gentleman of fortune, and in the time of peace between his country and Britain, paid a visit to London. There he became acquainted with the subject of this report. Monsieur Delarade, speaking English imperfectly, employed him as interpreter, and for this he made him his confidential friend. He had, it appeared, long contemplated to rob his countryman and benefactor; and for this purpose, one evening, when he had attended him to the play, pretending an excuse, he returned to Monsieur Delarade's, and robbed them of property to the value of two thousand pounds. These effects, consisting both of money and goods, he carried off in a hackney coach; but the number being fortunately taken by a neighbour, who suspected some foul play, he was traced thereby to Bristol, and seized, with the greatest part of the property, at the instant of his embarking to a distant land. This being fully proved, he was convicted and executed.

 

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